Matthew J.

Profile: Matthew J. Mayer

Associate Professor
Faculty
 

 

Professional Affiliations:
 
American Educational Research Association (AERA)
 
American Psychological Association (APA)
(Division 16, School Psychology)
Associate Editor, School Psychology Quarterly
 
Council for Exceptional Children
(Council for Children with Behavioral Disorders; Division of Learning Disabilities)
 
National Service:
 
2012

Member, American Educational Research Association (AERA) Task Force on Bullying (8 members)

American Educational Research Association

(April, 2010 Capitol Hill Briefing)
2007-2012
President, Board of Directors,
Consortium to Prevent School Violence
2005-2009:   
Member, Advocacy and Governmental Affairs Committee,
Council for Children with Behavioral Disorders
2003-2005:      
Secretary and Archivist-Historian,
Council for Children with Behavioral Disorders
2002-2007:         
Resource Fellow,
The National Center on Education, Disability and Juvenile Justice
 
Research Publications Review
 
2004 to present:     Editorial Board, Behavioral Disorders
2004 to present:     Editorial Board, Journal of School Violence

2012 - 2014            Editorial Board, School Psychology Quarterly
2004 to present:     Reviewer, Behavioral Disorders
2004 to present:     Reviewer, Education and Treatment of Children
2004 to present:     Reviewer, Journal of School Violence
2005 to present:     Reviewer, Child Development
2007 to present:     Reviewer, Exceptional Children
2009 to present:     Reviewer, Journal of Adolescent Health
2009 to present:     Reviewer, Educational Researcher

 
A THOUGHT ON DISABILITY
 
Please listen to this song--Italy and France
by folksinger, Debi Smith
 
It is based on the essay, Welcome to Holland (see below)

 

Welcome to Holland 

by Emily Perl Kingsley
writer and activist for children with special needs

When you’re going to have a baby, it’s like planning a fabulous vacation trip to Italy. You buy a bunch of guide books and make your wonderful plans. The Coliseum, the Sistine Chapel, Gondolas. You may learn some handy phrases in Italian. It’s all very exciting. After several months of eager anticipation, the day finally arrives. You pack your bags and off you go. Several hours later, the plane lands. The stewardess comes in and says, “Welcome to Holland!” “Holland?” you say. “What do you mean, Holland? I signed up for Italy. I’m supposed to be in Italy. All my life I’ve dreamed of going to Italy.” But there’s been a change in the flight plan. They’ve landed in Holland and there you must stay. The important thing is that they haven’t taken you to a horrible, disgusting, filthy place full of pestilence, famine, and disease. It’s just a different place. So, you must go out and buy new guidebooks. And you must learn a whole new language. And you will meet a whole new group of people you would never have met. It’s just a different place. It’s slower paced than Italy, less flashy than Italy. But after you’ve been there for a while and you catch your breath, you look around. You begin to notice that Holland has windmills. Holland has tulips. And Holland even has Rembrandts. But everyone you know is busy coming and going from Italy, and they’re all bragging about what a wonderful time they had there. And for the rest of your life you will say, “Yes, that’s where I was supposed to go. That’s what I had planned.” And the pain of that experience will never, ever, ever, go away. The loss of that dream is a very significant loss. But if you spend your life mourning the fact that you didn’t get to Italy, you may never be free to enjoy the very special, the very lovely things about Holland.

 

Education

Ph.D., University of Maryland, College Park

Expertise & Research Interest

School Violence Prevention

Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions

Emotional Behavioral Disorders

Structural Equation Modeling

Standards for Evidence-Based Practice

Research Work With Students

School Violence Prevention

Bullying Prevention

Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions

Emotional Behavioral Disorders

Structural Equation Modeling

Standards for Evidence-Based Practice

Recent & Selected Publications

Mayer, M. J., & Nickerson, A. B. (in press) Guest Editors for Special Issue of School Psychology Review on School Safety and School Violence.

Mayer, M. J., & Cornell, D.G. Guest Editors for Special Issue of Educational Researcher on School Safety and School Violence. January 2010.

Mayer, M. J., Lochman, J. E., & Van Acker, R. Guest Editors for Special Issue of Behavioral Disorders on cognitive-behavioral interventions. May, 2005.

EDITED BOOKS

Osher, D., Mayer, M. J., Jagers, R., Kendziora, K., & Wood, L. (Eds.). (2019). Keeping Students Safe and Helping Them Thrive: A Collaborative Handbook on School Safety, Mental Health, and Wellness. (Vol. 1 & 2). New York: Praeger/ABC-CLIO.

Mayer, M. J., & Jimerson, S. R. (Eds.). (2018). School Safety and Violence Prevention: Science, Practice, Policy. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association

Jimerson, S. R., Nickerson, A., Mayer, M. J., & Furlong, M. J. (Eds.). (2012). Handbook of school violence and school safety: International research and practice (2nd ed.) Routledge.

Mayer, M. J., Van Acker, R., Lochman, J. E., & Gresham, F. M. (Eds.). (2008). Cognitive-behavioral interventions for emotional and behavioral disorders: School-based practice. New York: Guilford Press

REFEREED JOURNAL ARTICLES

Mayer, M. J., Nickerson, A. B., & Jimerson, S. R. (2021; online). Preventing School Violence and Promoting School Safety: Contemporary Scholarship Advancing Science, Practice, and Policy. School Psychology Review.

Cornell, D. G., Mayer, M. J., & Sulkowski, M. L. (2021; online). History and future of school safety research. School Psychology Review. DOI: 10.1080/2372966X.2020.1857212

Interdisciplinary Group On Preventing School And Community Violence. (2013). December 2012 Connecticut School Shooting Position Statement. Journal of School Violence, 12(2), 119-133.

Mayer, M. J., & Cornell, D. G. (Eds.). (2010). New perspectives on school safety and violence prevention. Special issue of Educational Researcher.

Cornell, D. G., & Mayer, M. J. (2010). Why does school order and safety matter? Educational Researcher, 39, 7-15.

Mayer, M. J., & Furlong, M. J. (2010). How safe are our schools? Educational Researcher, 39, 16-26.

Mayer, M. J. (2010). Structural Analysis of 1995-2005 School Crime Supplement datasets: Factors influencing students’ fear, anxiety, and avoidant behaviors. Journal of School Violence, 9, 37-55.

Honors & Awards

2018: 50 most cited in media Rutgers faculty

2016: American Psychological Association Distinguished Service Award for work as Associate Editor of School Psychology Quarterly.

Professional Affiliations

American Psychological Association

Research Journal Positions:

Associate Editor, School Psychology (Division 16, American Psychological Association)

Editorial Boards: Behavioral Disorders; Journal of School Violence

Files

 

  • Phone: 
    (848) 932-0843
  • Office Address: 
    10 Seminary Place
    Room 335
    New Brunswick, NJ 08901
  • Video Tips for Educators
    (under construction)