Kedra N.

Profile: Kedra N. Gamble

Assistant Professor
Faculty

Kedra Gamble is an Assistant Professor of Professional Practice in the Graduate School of Education's Department of Learning and Teaching. She has extensive K-12 experience, having served as a classroom teacher, reading interventionist, literacy coach, and professional learning facilitator. Before joining the GSE faculty, Kedra was a curriculum supervisor in the areas of English Language Arts, Social Studies and ESL.

Dr. Gamble's academic and teaching work is grounded in developing, supporting, and refining structures that empower, prepare, and inspire educators to meet the diverse needs of the students they serve. She prioritizes students' access to rich, relevant, and culturally responsive education, particularly in contexts where they have been routinely underserved and marginalized by structures of inequity in the public education system.

Professional Affiliations

TESOL
American Educational Research Association
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development
International Literacy Association
National Council of Teachers of English
Learning Forward (National Staff Development Council)

Education

Ph.D.  December, 2014
Rutgers University,Graduate School of NewBrunswick/Graduate
School of Education, New Brunswick, NJ
Learning, Cognition, Instruction, and Development; Area of Study: Literacy Education
       
Ed.M.   May, 1996 Rutgers University, Graduate School of Education,
New Brunswick, NJ
Early Childhood/Elementary Education; Literacy Concentration
                                                                                               
B.A.      May, 1994
Rutgers University, Rutgers College, New Brunswick, NJ
English and Psychology

Expertise & Research Interest

Literacy

Teacher Quality

Race & Equity in Education

Research Work With Students

My recent doctoral research was focused on uncovering and negotiating the sociopolitical and contextual constraints faced by school leaders in identifying and addressing teachers’ professional learning needs. In urban districts, these constraints may be even more prominent and
influential. Therefore, I am interested in studying how the unique challenges faced by administrators, teachers and students in urban settings can be mediated and addressed through the design of high-quality, context-informed professional learning programs.

Recent & Selected Publications

Gamble, K. N. (2014). Revealing and dealing with the “messy stuff”: the role of needs assessment in identifying, negotiating and planning for complex district learning needs (Doctoral dissertation, Rutgers University-Graduate School-New Brunswick).