Ebelia

Profile: Ebelia Hernández

Associate Professor
Faculty

Dr. Hernández’s research agenda centers on the Latino college student experience. She is particularly interested in how their experiences and the ways that they get involved may influence their holistic development. She has approached her work in a variety of ways that includes historical research and the use of critical race theory as a theoretical perspective. This work has led to publications and presentations at national conferences in the areas of Latino college student activism, spirituality, self-authorship, and engagement.

Professional Affiliations:

American College Personnel Association (ACPA)
Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE)

Education

Ph.D., Higher Education and Student Affairs
Indiana University, Bloomington - Fall 2008

M.S., Counseling
California State University, Northridge - June 2005
College Counseling/Student Services specialization

B.A., English
California State University, Chico, May 1997

Expertise & Research Interest

Latinos/as in Higher Education
Critical Race Theory
Student Development

Research Work With Students

Dr. Hernández is currently conducting a longitudinal study on Latina undergraduates to examine the interplays between engagement and holistic development.

She is also conducting a historical study about Latinas at Indiana University.  She is interested in investigating the impact of establishing Latina-based sororities on campus impacted their communities on campus.

Recent & Selected Publications

Hernández, E. (2017).  From the fields to fieldwork: Cuentos from the daughter of migrant farmworkers.  In P. A. Pérez and M. E. Zarate (Eds.), Facilitating educational success for migrant farmworker students in the U.S, (pp. 113-120).  New York, NY: Routledge.

Hernández, E. (2017).  Critical theoretical perspectives. In J. Schuh, V. Torres, & S. R. Jones (Eds.), Student services: A handbook for the profession, (6th ed.), (pp. 205-219). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Hernández, E. (2016). Utilizing critical race theory to examine race/ethnicity, racism, and power in student development theory and research. Journal of College Student Development, 57(2), 168-180.

Abes, E., & Hernández, E. (2016).  Critical and poststructural perspectives on self-authorship.  In E. S. Abes (Ed.), New Directions for Student Services – Diverse and Critical Perspectives on Student Development Theory, (pp. 97-108).  San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Hernández, E. (2015).  Balancing realities and dreams: The college choice process for Latinas.  The Journal of Latinos and Education, 14(3), 202-219.

Hernández, E. (2015). What is “good” research?  Revealing the paradigmatic tensions in quantitative criticalist work.  In R. Wells & F. Stage (Eds.), New Directions for Institutional Research: New scholarship in critical quantitative research – Part 2: New populations, approaches, and challenges, (pp. 93-101). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Banks, W, Hammond, D., &. Hernández, E. (2014).  Serving diverse student populations in college unions. In D. M. DeSawal and T. Yakaboski (Eds.), New Directions for Student Services - The state of the college union: Contemporary issues and trends, (pp. 13-25). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Hernández, E. (2013). Mexican American women’s activism at Indiana University in the 1990s.  The Journal of Higher Education, 84(3), 397-416.

Hernández, E., Mobley, M., Coryell, G., *Yu, E., & *Martinez, G. (2013).  Examining the cultural validity of a college student engagement survey for Latinos. Journal of Hispanic Higher Education, 12(2), 153-173. 

Hernández, E. (2012). The journey towards developing political consciousness through activism for Mexican American women.  Journal of College Student Development, 53(5), 680-702.

Hernández, E. (2011). Words: The windows to our assumptions and truth. In P. Magolda and M. B. Baxter Magolda (Eds.), Contested issues in student affairs: Diverse perspectives and respectful dialogue, (pp. 291-296). Sterling, VA: Stylus.

Torres, V., & Hernández, E. (2009). Influence of an identified advisor/mentor on urban Latino students’ college experience. Journal of College Student Retention, 11(1), 141-160.

Torres, V., & Hernández, E. (2007). The influence on ethnic identity on self-authorship: A longitudinal study of Latino/a college students. Journal of College Student Development, 48(5), 558-573.

Honors & Awards

Dr. Hernández's scholarship and contributions to the higher education community have garnered national recognition.  In 2016, she was named a Rutgers University Chancellor's Scholar.  She was selected for the 2013 ACPA Annuit Coeptus award.  Also, Dr. Hernández was named a 2011 ACPA Emerging Scholar, and a Faculty Fellow for American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education (AAHHE).  Dr. Hernandez was also selected to participate in the ASHE Institute on Equity and Policy Analysis in summer 2009.

Her dissertation, which revealed the impact of engaging in advocacy and activism on the self-authorship of Mexican American women was a NASPA Melvene Hardee Dissertation of the Year finalist.

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