Ph.D. Dissertation Defense: Stephen Coffin

Tuesday, November 27, 2018 1:30pm - 3:30pm

GSE 011

A STUDY OF THE NAPCS-BASED AND RESEARCH-BASED POLICY SETS TO IDENTIFY THE MOST LIKELY DETERMINANTS OF CHARTER SCHOOL MARKET SHARE

Stephen is a doctoral student in the Theory, Organization, and Policy concentration of the Doctor of Philosphy program. 

Committee: Steven Barnett (Chair), Drew Gitomer, Benjamin Justice, Julia Sass Rubin

ABSTRACT

Theoretically, charter schools are designed to offer greater choice than other intra-district or inter-district choice models. Charter schools are a public school choice model that seeks to expand choice beyond that offered by movement from one neighborhood or district to another. Charter schools provide the opportunity for parents to choose their children’s schools without having to obtain residency in a targeted catchment area. Thus, charter schools offer a new model of nonresidential-based choice in which consumers vote with their seat by changing schools, rather than their feet, and who choose a new school without moving their place of residence. Voting with your seat transforms the public school choice model by supplementing traditional inter-district residency-based competition with nonresidential-based competition among different charter schools and TPSs independent of geographic location.

The broad hypothesis of this study is that differences in state charter school laws affect charter school market share. In addition, this study seeks to quantify the relative importance of specific policies jointly and individually as influences on the charter market share. Charter school advocates, such as the CER and NAPCS, posit that the strongest policies are those that place minimal or no limitations on charter school formation, numbers, enrollment, autonomy, operational flexibility, accountability, or funding.

The focus of this study is to provide a better understanding of the predictive strength of different policies in determining the charter school share of the public education market and the influence of charter school share on overall enrollment in public education. As the NAPCS’ policy identification is based on one particular theoretical perspective, I will investigate the relative importance of state policies as determinants of charter school market share based on my literature review. Specifically, I will assess how well my literature review-based set of policies predicts market share as compared to the NAPCS-based set plus the extent to which the charter school market share increases the overall public school share of the education market. Identifying the policies that most likely have the greatest predictive strength of charter school market share will help inform policymakers who make highly consequential decisions on state charter laws.

     

Who to contact:

Ericka Diaz

ericka.diaz@gse.rutgers.edu