Announcement of Ed.D. Dissertation Proposal Defense:African-American Students and Honors Program Participation at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Friday, February 14, 2020 12:30pm - 2:00pm

GSE 36A

Announcement of Ed.D. Dissertation Proposal Defense:African-American Students and Honors Program Participation at Historically Black Colleges and Universities: Self-Perceptions of Connections Between Collegiate Honors Academic and Social Experiences and Post-Graduate Academic and Professional Outcomes

 

We know little about how the undergraduate experiences of African American students enrolled in honors programs and colleges at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) correlate with the post-graduate/lifelong academic and professional outcomes realized by such students. How are those students supported by their institutions? How do those students support each other as undergraduates and alumni? As alumni, how do they “give back/pay it forward” and assist efforts to sustain the HBCUs from which they have graduated, as well as support undergraduates who follow in their footsteps? There are bound to be robust and instructive answers to these questions. By studying the undergraduate experiences and post-graduate outcomes of such students, we can begin to expand the literature about HBCUs and better understand how these institutions serve academically-high-achieving African American students.
   
   The methods employed in this qualitative study include semi-structured interviews/video-recordings of individuals who are alumni of honors programs or colleges at HBCUs located on the East Coast, border states, and the South, and small focus group sessions with undergrduates in the Keystone Honors Academy of Cheyney University of Pennsylvania. Document (e.g., campus newspapers, event flyers, alumni newsletters, etc.) review will assist in providing a robust picture of the HBCU honors experience. In interviewing HBCU honors alumni of different ages/generations and conducting focus groups with current HBCU honors students, this study also aims to show that, while times have changed, certain especially intentional features of HBCU honors programs and colleges, such as mentoring and professional development (Mitchell, 2002), have not, and those features continue to empower HBCU honors students to excel academically and professionally.
   Ultimately, this study is also a form of oral history, and the findings of this study will be presented in both dissertation and short documentary form. Preliminary results derived from interviews with three study participants support the feasability and value of the study; analysis of these interviews indicate that HBCU honors program alumni see clear connections between both their undergraduate academic success and their post-graduate academic and professional gains. Prospective participants have shared that they are highly appreciative of and invested in the goals of the study.

     

Who to contact:

Karima I. A. Bouchenafa

kb798@scarletmail.rutgers.edu